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  1. Dec 19, 2019

    satish

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    Andhra CM Jagan Reddy’s 'capital' plan: Amaravati (legislative), Visakhapatnam (executive), Kurnool (judicial)
    India

    Updated Dec 18, 2019 | 16:16 IST | Times Now Digital



    The Republic of South Africa has three capital cities - Pretoria (administrative capital), Cape Town (legislative capital), and Bloemfontein (judicial capital).

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    File picture: Andhra Pradesh Chief Minister YS Jagan Mohan Reddy | Photo Credit: Times Now

    KEY HIGHLIGHTS
    • Andhra Pradesh CM YS Jagan Mohan Reddy said that not much expenditure would be required to set up executive capital at Visakhapatnam.
    • During the debate over Amaravati, the Speaker suspended nine Telugu Desam Party members for obstructing the proceedings
    • Prime Minister Narendra Modi had laid the foundation stone for Amaravati as the Andhra Pradesh capital in 2015
    https://www.timesnownews.com/india/...ial-amaravati-legislative-south-africa/528883
     
  2. Dec 19, 2019

    satish

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  3. Dec 19, 2019

    satish

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  4. Dec 22, 2019

    satish

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    Expert committee suggests Andhra Secretariat at Visakhapatnam, HC at Kurnool
    3 min read . Updated: 20 Dec 2019, 08:39 PM IST Yunus Y. Lasania
    • The six-member panel comprising urban planning experts and headed by retired IAS officer G. N. Rao, submitted its report to the Chief Minister on Friday
    • Rao told a news conference later that the panel suggested moving 'some of the capital functions and not the capital' to some other areas keeping in view the requirements in the state



    Hyderabad: The G.N. Rao-led expert committee formed to look into Andhra Pradesh’s development has recommended the state government to have Visakhapatnam as the executive capital and Kurnool (in Rayalaseema region) as the legal capital, where the High Court would be.

    The recommendations are on the same lines of what chief minister Y.S. Jagan Mohan Reddy has said earlier this week in the assembly, and will completely undo everything that former chief minister and Telugu Desam Party supremo N. Chandrababu Naidu had planned for Amaravati, which was to be developed as a global city.

    Addressing a press conference, G.N. Rao, a former IAS officer, said that the committee has recommended the AP government to decentralize development by having three capital cities for legislature, executive and judiciary and “put the available resources to the best use with concern on environment and balanced regional growth". The committee report has also suggested that the chief minister’s office also function from Vishakhatnam.

    “Certain functions of the capital wanted to be removed. The secretariat we suggested to move to Visakhapatnam and also provide a bench (of the High Court) at both Amaravati and Visakhapatnam. The legislative capital will be in Amravati," said Rao, who also added that Visakhapatnam and Amaravati will both also have High Court benches.

    “The budget and winter sessions of the Assembly will be held at Amaravati and Visakhapatnam, and the Raj Bhavan and the assembly will be located between Mangalagiri and Nagarjuna Univesity (in the capital region area) which is not flood prone," said a press release form the AP government. When asked about Amaravati’s future, Rao, however, stressed that Amaravati will continue to remain as the capital.

    “Taking the Karnataka model into account, the state will be divided into four zones with Srikakulam, Vizianagaram and Visakhapatnam forming the north zone, followed by East and West Godavari districts and Krishna as the central coastal region. Guntur, Prakasam and Nellore coming under south costal the four south western districts forming Rayalaseema. The four regions will have a commissionerate which will take care of all the issues of the respective regions," stated the release.

    Earlier, Reddy this week in the assembly dropped hints that the state might get three new capitals instead of one. During a seven-day assembly session, he had mentioned earlier that Vishakhapatnam and Kurnool cities could also be considered to divide the functioning between Amaravati and those two places.

    The committee, which was formed in September, “has taken into consideration all the aspects and has toured all the regions and had taken public opinion receiving 30,000 representations and has extensively toured the 29 villages and has recommended returning the land where there is no need", mentioned the release.

    The recommendations, if implemented, will completely turn around what Naidu had planned to develop in Amaravati. During his previous term (2014-19), he had planned for a Start-up area, and three grand structures for secretariat, assembly and High Court in Amaravati.

    Naidu’s government had pooled in about 33,000 acres of farm lands in the capital region from farmers, promising them land in the capital apart from giving them an income every month to make up the loss of agricultural income they would incur. The Committee headed by G.N. Rao, include Viajy Mohan. R Annjali Mohan, Dr Mahavir, Dr Subba Rao and Arnachalam had submitted its report to the government here on Friday.

    Ever since the Reddy-led YSR Congress Party (YSRCP) came to power this may, Amaravati has suffered one setback after another. From the World Bank withdrawing its funding to the start-up area project being terminated, Reddy has majorly undone Naidu’s pet project of building the Amaravati capital city. The Startup area project that was planned in Amaravati by Naidu was terminated by the AP government recently.

    The Singapore consortium that partnered the government for the project pulled out of it. The 1,700-acre (in the core area of Amaravati) Startup area project was to be undertaken by the Singapore Amaravati Investment Holdings (SAIH), which had last year formalized its collaboration with the AP government to jointly master-develop the startup area with the Amaravati Development Corp. (ADC), a state government agency.

    That development was preceded by the World Bank and the Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank withdrawing their $500 million funding in July (based on a request from the Centre for the same). “If Jagan wants to destroy AP and its development, then so be it," remarked a TDP leader, who did not want to be quoted.


    https://www.livemint.com/news/india...sakhapatnam-hc-at-kurnool-11576854343338.html
     
  5. Dec 22, 2019

    satish

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  6. Dec 22, 2019

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    Whither Amaravati?: on three capital cities for Andhra Pradesh
    DECEMBER 21, 2019 00:02 IST
    UPDATED: DECEMBER 21, 2019 14:33 IST


    There was a time for the idea for three capitals in Andhra Pradesh, but it is long past

    Sometimes ideas can sound good, but when it comes to implementation they need to be tested for feasibility and, importantly, timing. Andhra Pradesh Chief Minister Y.S. Jagan Mohan Reddy hinted on Tuesday that the South African model of three capitals was best suited in his State and that his government would work towards this.

    In South Africa, the administrative capital is in Pretoria, its national legislature in Cape Town and its judicial capital in Bloemfontein. Mr. Reddy’s idea seems to stem from the reasoning that a distribution of executive, legislative and judicial governance across Visakhapatnam, Amaravati (the current capital) and Kurnool would allow for “a decentralised development of the State”.

    The location choices are in the upper, central and lower geographical regions. Such an arrangement follows the recommendations of the expert committee appointed by the Home Affairs Ministry in 2014 to study alternatives for a new capital. Chaired by K.C. Sivaramakrishnan, the panel had argued against the need for a greenfield capital city and to instead focus on distributing locations of governance beyond the Vijayawada-Guntur-Tenali-Mangalagiri urban area, while utilising the time period of 10 years to continue functions from Hyderabad after bifurcation.

    The Chief Minister’s idea has got support from the government-appointed G.N. Rao committee; it has recommended that the Assembly’s location be retained at Amaravati, with the Secretariat and High Court moved to Visakhapatnam and Kurnool, respectively.

    Despite the expert committee’s recommendations, the A.P. government led by the Telugu Desam Party had decided to build a grand capital in Amaravati, and had acquired large parcels of land from farmers. The Secretariat and Legislative Assembly were shifted to Amaravati in 2016, while the High Court began functioning in the beginning of 2019. Amaravati, which still requires significant development, has become a functioning State capital for all purposes now. But it is no surprise that many farmers, who had agreed to give up fertile land for the expansion of the capital as part of a land pooling scheme and were to have received residential and commercial plots among other forms of compensation, have protested the decision to decentralise capital functions.

    If the government limits Amaravati to hosting only the Assembly, it must take into account the concerns of affected farmers. That said, the fact that considerable work has been completed in Amaravati to utilise the fledgling city as a functioning capital must be taken into account before embarking upon the “decentralisation” idea, which was best served before the works in Amaravati began. Abandoning the plan that is already in place will render the grand city an unviable one. As in politics, in governance, timing is everything.

    https://www.thehindu.com/opinion/ed...al-city-of-andhra-pradesh/article30361974.ece
     
  7. Dec 31, 2019

    satish

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  8. Jan 9, 2020

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  9. Jan 17, 2020

    satish

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    Opinion: Let Amaravati be
    A capital city is a community space that serves as an influential marker of a state’s culture, history, and people, but that is now being challenged.



    [​IMG]
    VOICES OPINION THURSDAY, JANUARY 16, 2020 - 09:17


    By Naga Sravan Kilaru and Vamsi Viraj

    When the new state of Andhra Pradesh emerged in 2014, it was saddled with disproportionate debts, inadequate sources of revenue, and most importantly, no capital city.

    Hyderabad was supposed to serve as a joint capital for 10 years but there needed to be a long-term vision for building a new capital. The shifting of government machinery and the Assembly from Hyderabad was definitive in how it signaled to people, the importance of a capital.


    If the Telugu Desam Party (TDP) government had stayed in Hyderabad while building Amaravati, the new capital would not have been invested with the kind of urgency and sense of purpose needed. Only when top officials are seen to be working in the new capital can the people come to believe in it, and invest in it.

    While the formation of Telangana fulfilled the aspirations of its people, the state of Andhra faced an existential crisis with no sense of purpose or manifest destiny.

    A capital city is a community space that serves as an influential marker of a state’s culture, history, and people. By focusing the energies of people, and in being a place of opportunity and aspirations, a capital serves as a growth engine that drives the entire state forward, in pursuit of growth and welfare.

    Shifting of capitals, echoes of history

    The Congress stalwarts of the 1950s, Neelam Sanjiva Reddy and Tanguturi Prakasam Pantulu, did not want the Vijayawada-Guntur region as the capital since it was considered a Communist bastion back then. This was despite the Telugu members of the Madras Legislative Assembly, in July 1953, voting in favor of shifting their capital from Kurnool to this region.

    The YSRCP government’s decision to decentralise the capital has evoked varied reactions from the people, media, and political leaders.

    Multiple reasons are being given for this shifting, which is mainly being portrayed as a means to decentralise development, following the model of South Africa, which has its legislative capital in Cape Town, administrative capital in Pretoria, and its apex courts in other cities. However, the modern history and race relations of South Africa are far removed from that of Andhra Pradesh. It is also not feasible to shift capitals after five years spent developing lands, constructions, and inviting investments with a promise of stable governance.

    Though this is made out to be about decentralisation of development, Visakhapatnam will effectively be the capital with the all-important Secretariat and CMO to be shifted to the city. When Amaravati was being built, there was consensus among all parties though questions were raised about costs and land pooling. Soil from several thousand villages all across the state was collected in laying the foundation of Amaravati. One could feel the sense of a shared destiny, a sense of belonging from every village and town of Andhra Pradesh in the founding of Amaravati.

    Amaravati and Hyderabad - the issue of legacies

    Amaravati was to repeat the growth story of Hyderabad, to be built as a lasting legacy where the major contributors again, were the enterprising Telugu people.

    Over the last two decades, we had the phenomenon of Telugu youth migrating abroad in search of better opportunities. Amaravati was to become a global city, a place that intended to retain this talent and also attracts talent from elsewhere.

    While strong foundations for the Hyderabad growth story were laid by then CM Chandrababu Naidu, he lost power in 2004 just as the city was taking off as a formidable rival to Bangalore.

    Credit must be given to the succeeding government under YSR, who continued to back the city’s IT-powered transformation into a megacity. When power changed hands from TDP to Congress, there was an implicit understanding between the top leaders of both parties that while they were political opponents, there would be continuity in governance, development and economic reforms.

    The state's interests trumped all politics and personal vendettas. Projects that were begun under Chandrababu Naidu were continued and completed by his successor.

    The romance of building a new city harked back to the glory of Satavahanas, one of the earliest empire-builders of the subcontinent, who had their capital at Amaravati. Similarly, later in history, Buddhism prevailed here and took deep roots.

    Amaravati had an appeal that united people across all sections and all regions of Andhra. Partnerships with foreign firms and countries were established, a Start-up Area was envisioned to be developed by a Singaporean consortium, and universities were invited to build their campuses here.

    Just as Hyderabad forms an essential thread of the story of united Andhra Pradesh, Amaravati now was to continue that thread, as a better version, based on sound principles of building new-age cities.

    But now, the legacies of the TDP government are being attacked without the realisation that these were built over the past 5 years by not just a party or a leader, but by the people of Andhra Pradesh. In contesting these legacies, what is being questioned is our new identity itself.

    It is high time the current Chief Minister heeds the voices of people protesting on the ground, set aside his vendetta politics, and takes decisions in the interests of Andhra Pradesh.

    Vamsi Viraj is an alumnus of IIT Chennai and a political analyst. Naga Sravan Kilaru is a National Youth Awardee, 2018 and a political activist, who has worked with the TDP. Views expressed are the authors' own.




    https://www.thenewsminute.com/article/opinion-let-amaravati-be-116184
     
  10. Jan 19, 2020

    satish

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